Decimus Burton – Work Outside London

Architectural perspective of the garden elevation, Baston Cottage, Tunbridge Wells By Decimus Burton, c. 1831

Architectural perspective of the garden elevation, Baston Cottage, Tunbridge Wells By Decimus Burton, c. 1831

Detailed View

Architectural perspective of Fleetwood, Lancashire By Decimus Burton, 1836

Architectural perspective of Fleetwood, Lancashire By Decimus Burton, 1836

Detailed View

Longitudinal section of a church believed to be Holy Trinity Eastbourne By Decimus Burton c. 1837

Longitudinal section of a church believed to be Holy Trinity Eastbourne By Decimus Burton c. 1837

Detailed View

Architectural perspective of a cottage orné By Decimus Burton c. 1830

Architectural perspective of a cottage orné By Decimus Burton c. 1830

Detailed View


Decimus Burton was involved in several development schemes outside London. The first of these was at Calverley Park in Tunbridge Wells, an estate bought in the 1820s by John Ward who had employed Decimus on the re-building of his country home, Holwood in Kent. At Calverley, Decimus applied Nash’s formula of setting detached villas in a shared landscape and providing nearby service areas. The project was similar in spirit to his father’s contemporary development at St. Leonards.

Museum Accession No: HASMG 998.25.8.6

 

He also designed the new town of Fleetwood in Lancashire, the brainchild of local landowner, Peter Hesketh- Fleetwood who wanted to establish a seaport at the mouth of the River Wyre.  This would take advantage of the recently opened rail terminal at Preston and ferry passengers on to Scotland by sea as no line had yet been built across the Cumbrian Fells.
A prospectus was issued in 1837 and the town experienced a boom in the early 1840s until a rail link was established with Scotland in 1847.

Museum Accession No: HASMG 903.2.16

 

Other town planning schemes included work at Eastbourne for the Duke of Devonshire. The only element of the project to survive is Holy Trinity Church which was built in the gothic style, although drawings in the Hastings Museum show that an classical version was also considered.

Decimus designed a number of medium sized country houses and villas and elevations and plans of these survive in the Museum of both classical and rustic type.

Museum Accession No: HASMG 900.2.35

 

In the 1850s he began a second phase of building at St. Leonards, acquiring more land from the Eversfield estate and extending his father’s development westward along the seafront and around the edges of the Subscription Gardens and Archery Ground.

Museum Accession No: HASMG 998.25.8.5

 

Design elevation of the entrance front, Speldhurst House, Kent By Decimus Burton c. 1831

Museum Accession No: HASMG 903.2.19

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